crochet needle

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Basic Glove

This mohair glove can be knitted in two lengths. The gloves were knitted from a skein of yarn left over after knitting a lace sweater. I wanted to have long gloves to wear with the sweater, but wasn't sure if I had enough yarn remaining, so I decided to start with a provisional cast on 4" from the wrist bone. This ensured that I had enough yarn to complete a pair of short gloves and could invisibly pick up stitches to augment the length afterwards. Shown is the short length, with the provisional cast on (green yarn) at the cuff.

Basic Toe Up Sock

There are times when a toe-up sock might be the preferred construction method, for example with slip stitch patterns that traverse multiple rows, like the fireflowers stitch pattern. Other cable or multi-row patterns may also benefit from a toe-up approach. It is more aesthetically pleasing to start and end a cable pattern in the middle; by starting long patterns at the toes, rather than the cuff, you are not left with awkward pattern adjustments to accomodate various foot lengths. You can more easily add a few stitch pattern rows before beginning the cuff for a pleasing transition, than reduce pattern rows on the foot to achieve a pleasing end. Perhaps the best reason of all for a toe up sock is when knitting for children--you can lengthen the sock as they grow, as you could for sleeves on a top down sweater for a child. For these cases there is a slightly modified cuff.

New Monica Knits Baby Sock Pattern for Sale!

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