Heritage Spinning & Weaving, Inc.

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On-line and bricks and mortar store. Knitting and crochet tools, notions, yarns, patterns, books and spinning supplies. Lessons.

Indian Stitch Beaded Scarf

I love the rich colors and soft hand of Heritage Bloomfield Handpainted yarn and enjoyed knitting something for myself for a change. The pattern was easy to memorize and the yarn, beads and pattern were packaged in a convenient kit. I made the longer scarf and elected not to add a fringe.
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Kitchener or K1P1 Sewn Bind-off

This article describes two methods of performing the Kitchener bind-off. It is also known as a K1P1 or tubular bind off. This k1, p1 bind off complements k1, p1 ribbing and produces a neat border suitable for necklines, sleeves, fingerless mittens (shown at left) and other finished edges. Read more for stepwise, illustrated instructions.
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Basic Toe Up Sock

There are times when a toe-up sock might be the preferred construction method, for example with slip stitch patterns that traverse multiple rows, like the fireflowers stitch pattern. Other cable or multi-row patterns may also benefit from a toe-up approach. It is more aesthetically pleasing to start and end a cable pattern in the middle; by starting long patterns at the toes, rather than the cuff, you are not left with awkward pattern adjustments to accomodate various foot lengths. You can more easily add a few stitch pattern rows before beginning the cuff for a pleasing transition, than reduce pattern rows on the foot to achieve a pleasing end. Perhaps the best reason of all for a toe up sock is when knitting for children--you can lengthen the sock as they grow, as you could for sleeves on a top down sweater for a child. For these cases there is a slightly modified cuff.

Tools & Sources

The tools that I use for projects are listed here. Knitting and crochet needles have their own separate blog entries. I will add to this basic list, as I reference tools in projects.

Stitch MarkersMarkersStitch Markers: I use two types of split ring markers, one type (white in the photo) that I really like but haven't been able to find anymore. The small white, split-ring markers are very useful when knitting and marking fingering and sport weight yarns and when using small diameter needles. The green and orange markers locking stitch markers are better for larger diameter needles, when you want to hold a few stitches at a end of the row for completion later, to temporarily hold a dropped a stitch, or for marking increases and decreases. The green and orange markers are Clover Locking Stitch Markers (#353).

New Monica Knits Baby Sock Pattern for Sale!

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